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Tax Briefing(s)

                                                                                                                        November 2015

 To our Friends and Clients:

          As the fall leaves have come down, we all begin to think about the approaching holiday season. As we have seen in the past, many of our clients use this season to reflect on their lives and to think about the legacy they will leave behind. Estate planning has been around since the days of Pharaoh and the building of Pyramids. Now it is of course much easier to plan your estate and we encourage you to contact us to assist you with this delicate but necessary topic.

          Every client that uses our legal services to devise their estate plan will complete what we like to call the triple play of estate planning. Each client executes:

1) Last Will and Testament;

2) Power of Attorney; and

3) Health Care Proxy.

      WHAT SHOULD YOU BE THINKING ABOUT?

  • A Plan For The Disposition Of Your Assets
  • Estate Tax Planning To Minimize Estate Taxes Paid
  • Naming An Executor To Administer Estate
  • Naming Guardians And Trustees To Raise Children & Manage Their Assets
  • Creating Trusts to Benefit Children and Grand Children
  • If Married, to Utilize Maximum Exemptions To Reduce Estate Taxes

      What Else Should You Be Thinking About

  • A Plan For The Succession Or Sale Of A Family Business Or Practice
  • A Plan For Charitable Giving
  • Life Insurance To Support Your Family Or Provide Liquidity For The Estate And Methods to Keep Life Insurance Free of Estate Taxes
  • A Durable Power Of Attorney To Manage Finances Without Expense & Publicity Of Guardianship Hearing
  • A Health Care Proxy Which Names An Agent To Make Healthcare Decisions In The Event You Can’t Make Those Decisions
  • Living Trusts to Avoid Probate

We recommend that estate plans be reviewed every 2-4 years. Please call myself or Andrew Kirwin, Esq. to get the proverbial ball moving. As a courtesy to our clients, we shall provide a free half hour consultation regarding estate planning.

                                    

                                                                                                  We look forward to hearing from you.

 

                                                                                                                    


Republicans’ 2017 overhaul of the tax code created a new 20-percent deduction of qualified business income (QBI), subject to certain limitations, for pass-through entities (sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies, or S corporations). The controversial QBI deduction—also called the "pass-through" deduction—has remained an ongoing topic of debate among lawmakers, tax policy experts, and stakeholders.


Republicans’ 2017 overhaul of the tax code created a new 20-percent deduction of qualified business income (QBI), subject to certain limitations, for pass-through entities (sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies, or S corporations). The controversial QBI deduction—also called the "pass-through" deduction—has remained an ongoing topic of debate among lawmakers, tax policy experts, and stakeholders.


A bipartisan House bill has been introduced that would fix a GOP tax law drafting error known as the "retail glitch." The House bill, having over a dozen co-sponsors, is a companion measure to a bipartisan Senate bill introduced in March.


The House on April 9 approved by voice vote a bipartisan, bicameral IRS reform bill. The IRS bill, which now heads to the Senate, would redesign the IRS for the first time in over 20 years.


Proposed regulations address gains that may be deferred when taxpayers invest in a qualified opportunity fund (QOF). Taxpayers may generally rely on these new proposed regulations. The IRS has also requested comments.


The IRS has provided a safe harbor for professional sports teams to avoid the recognition of gain or loss when trading players and/or draft picks. Under the safe harbor provision, the traded player’s contract or the traded draft pick would have a zero basis.