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Tax Briefing(s)

                                                                                                                        November 2015

 To our Friends and Clients:

          As the fall leaves have come down, we all begin to think about the approaching holiday season. As we have seen in the past, many of our clients use this season to reflect on their lives and to think about the legacy they will leave behind. Estate planning has been around since the days of Pharaoh and the building of Pyramids. Now it is of course much easier to plan your estate and we encourage you to contact us to assist you with this delicate but necessary topic.

          Every client that uses our legal services to devise their estate plan will complete what we like to call the triple play of estate planning. Each client executes:

1) Last Will and Testament;

2) Power of Attorney; and

3) Health Care Proxy.

      WHAT SHOULD YOU BE THINKING ABOUT?

  • A Plan For The Disposition Of Your Assets
  • Estate Tax Planning To Minimize Estate Taxes Paid
  • Naming An Executor To Administer Estate
  • Naming Guardians And Trustees To Raise Children & Manage Their Assets
  • Creating Trusts to Benefit Children and Grand Children
  • If Married, to Utilize Maximum Exemptions To Reduce Estate Taxes

      What Else Should You Be Thinking About

  • A Plan For The Succession Or Sale Of A Family Business Or Practice
  • A Plan For Charitable Giving
  • Life Insurance To Support Your Family Or Provide Liquidity For The Estate And Methods to Keep Life Insurance Free of Estate Taxes
  • A Durable Power Of Attorney To Manage Finances Without Expense & Publicity Of Guardianship Hearing
  • A Health Care Proxy Which Names An Agent To Make Healthcare Decisions In The Event You Can’t Make Those Decisions
  • Living Trusts to Avoid Probate

We recommend that estate plans be reviewed every 2-4 years. Please call myself or Andrew Kirwin, Esq. to get the proverbial ball moving. As a courtesy to our clients, we shall provide a free half hour consultation regarding estate planning.

                                    

                                                                                                  We look forward to hearing from you.

 

                                                                                                                    


The IRS and the Treasury intend to provide regulations that will address issues affecting foreign corporations with previously taxed earnings and profits (PTEP). The regulations are in response to changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) ( P.L. 115-97)


The IRS has proposed regulations on the limitation on the business interest expense deduction under Code Sec. 163(j), as amended by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) ( P.L. 115-97). The IRS also has issued a safe harbor that allows taxpayers to treat certain infrastructure trades or businesses as real property trades or businesses solely for purposes of qualifying as an electing real property trade or business under Code Sec. 163(j)(7)(B).


A nonprofit corporation that operated a medical-marijuana dispensary legally under California law was not allowed to claim deductions for business expenses on its federal return. Code Sec. 280E, which prevents any trade or business that consists of trafficking in controlled substances from deducting any business expenses, applied.


The IRS released the optional standard mileage rates for 2019. Most taxpayers may use these rates to compute deductible costs of operating vehicles for:


The IRS has provided guidance and examples for calculating the nondeductible portion of parking expenses. In addition, the IRS has provided guidance to tax-exempt organizations to help such organizations determine how unrelated business taxable income (UBTI) will be increased by the nondeductible amount of such fringe benefit expenses paid or incurred.


The IRS has released initial guidance on the new Code Sec. 83(i), added by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ( P.L. 115-97).

Code Sec. 83 generally provides for the federal income tax treatment of property transferred in connection with the performance of services. Code Sec. 83(i) allows certain employees to elect to defer recognition of income attributable to the receipt or vesting of qualified stock for up to five years.


Highly anticipated foreign tax credit regulations have been issued that provide guidance on the significant changes made to the foreign tax credit rules by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ( P.L. 115-97).


Proposed regulations provide much anticipated guidance on the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (BEAT) under Code Sec. 59A and related reporting requirements. The regulations are proposed to apply generally to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, but taxpayers may rely on these proposed regulations until final regulations are published.


The IRS will grant automatic consent to accounting method changes to comply with new Code Sec. 451(b), as added by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ( P.L. 115-97). In addition, some taxpayers may make the accounting method change on their tax returns without filing a Form 3115, Application for Change in Accounting Method. These procedures generally apply to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017. Rev. Proc. 2018-31, I.R.B. 2018-22, 637, is modified.


The IRS has issued transition relief from the "once-in-always-in" condition for excluding part-time employees under Reg. §1.403(b)-5(b)(4)(iii)(B). Under the "once-in-always-in" exclusion condition, once an employee is eligible to make elective deferrals, the employee may not be excluded from making elective deferrals in any later exclusion year on the basis that he or she is a part-time employee.


The IRS has provided interim guidance for the 2019 calendar year on income tax withholding from wages and withholding from retirement and annuity distributions. In general, certain 2018 withholding rules provided in Notice 2018-14, I.R.B. 2018-7, 353, will remain in effect for the 2019 calendar year, with one exception.